The Public Policy and Population Health Observatory is a research network currently made up of four faculty at McGill University studying experimental and quasi-experimental evaluation methods for health policies and programs, their research teams, and students who are working in this area. 

 

Sam Harper

Sam Harper is an associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics & Occupational Health at McGill University. He is also a member of the McGill University Centre on Population Dynamics and the Montreal Health Equity Research Consortium.

His research focuses on understanding population health and its social distribution, with specific interests in impact evaluation, measuring health inequalities, global health, demography, cancer epidemiology, causal inference, and ethical issues in public health. 

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Jay Kaufman

Jay S. Kaufman holds a PhD in epidemiologic science from University of Michigan (1995). He was previously a professor at UNC School of Public Health in Chapel Hill (1999-2008) and is currently Professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health at McGill University (2009-present). His work focuses on social epidemiology, analytic methodology, and causal inference for various health outcomes.  He is an editor at Epidemiology and an associate editor at the American Journal of Epidemiology.  With J. Michael Oakes he is the co-editor of the textbook “Methods in Social Epidemiology” (2nd Edition, 2017).

 
 
 
 
 

Arijit Nandi

Arijit Nandi  holds a Canada Research Chair in the Political Economy of Global Health.  He is an Associate Professor jointly appointed at the Institute for Health and Social Policy and the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health. An epidemiologist by training, Dr. Nandi is broadly interested in the impact of social and economic factors on population health. His primary research interests are: (1) assessing multilevel associations between economic characteristics and population health; (2) investigating the relation between social and economic policies and population health and health disparities in a global context; and (3) estimating causal effects of economic interventions on mental health. A former Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholar at Harvard University, Dr. Nandi received a PhD from the Department of Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Erin Strumpf

Erin Strumpf is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics and the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health at McGill University. She is a William Dawson Scholar and holds a Chercheur boursier career award from the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Santé.  She received her PhD in Health Policy from Harvard University and her BA from Smith College.

Dr. Strumpf’s research in health economics focuses on evaluating the impacts of health and social policies on the health and wellbeing of individuals and populations, on inequalities across groups, and on the performance of the health care system. She uses administrative health data, large-scale surveys, and methods for causal inference - principally quasi-experimental designs - to estimate the effects of interventions and reforms in real-world settings. Dr. Strumpf and her research team actively collaborate with decision makers to generate relevant, usable knowledge to improve population health and health care system performance. She has presented her work to provincial ministries of health and of finance in Canada, and to policymakers in France and the United States.

 
 
 Nichole Austin is a PhD candidate in Epidemiology at McGill University, where she studies the complex ways in which social policies influence health and reinforce inequalities. Her specific research interests include policy evaluation, maternal/child health, marginalized populations, quasi-experimental methods, and (most recently) reproductive epidemiology. Her current work aims to quantify the impact of supply-side abortion restrictions (commonly known as “TRAP” laws) on service availability and abortion outcomes in the United States. Nichole holds an MSc in Epidemiology from McGill, and a BA in Psychology from Mount Holyoke College.

Nichole Austin is a PhD candidate in Epidemiology at McGill University, where she studies the complex ways in which social policies influence health and reinforce inequalities. Her specific research interests include policy evaluation, maternal/child health, marginalized populations, quasi-experimental methods, and (most recently) reproductive epidemiology. Her current work aims to quantify the impact of supply-side abortion restrictions (commonly known as “TRAP” laws) on service availability and abortion outcomes in the United States. Nichole holds an MSc in Epidemiology from McGill, and a BA in Psychology from Mount Holyoke College.

 Mabel Carabali Mosquera is pursuing her doctoral studies at McGill University under the supervision of Dr. Jay Kaufman, she was Tomlinson scholar and currently holds a Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarships Doctoral Awards (CGS-D).  She received a degree in medicine in Colombia (Universidad Libre-Cali) and a MSc in epidemiology of infectious diseases from the Institute of Tropical Medicine “Pedro Kouri”-IPK (Cuba). She has been working on the field of infectious diseases for the last ten years, especially on dengue fever; first at the International Research and Medical Training Center (CIDEIM) and later with the Dengue Vaccine Initiative consortium (DVI) as field epidemiologist for Latin America and West Africa. Her research interests include field epidemiology and applied public health research, infectious diseases (global burden and diseases transmission), health inequalities, and social determinants of health.  

Mabel Carabali Mosquera is pursuing her doctoral studies at McGill University under the supervision of Dr. Jay Kaufman, she was Tomlinson scholar and currently holds a Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarships Doctoral Awards (CGS-D).  She received a degree in medicine in Colombia (Universidad Libre-Cali) and a MSc in epidemiology of infectious diseases from the Institute of Tropical Medicine “Pedro Kouri”-IPK (Cuba). She has been working on the field of infectious diseases for the last ten years, especially on dengue fever; first at the International Research and Medical Training Center (CIDEIM) and later with the Dengue Vaccine Initiative consortium (DVI) as field epidemiologist for Latin America and West Africa. Her research interests include field epidemiology and applied public health research, infectious diseases (global burden and diseases transmission), health inequalities, and social determinants of health.  

 Dr. Claire Godard-Sebillotte is a French geriatrician with an expertise in Epidemiology. She is a Vanier Scholar and a recipient of the CIHR Institute of Aging Anne Martin-Matthews Doctoral Prize of Excellence in Research on Aging. Her career goal is to be a clinician researcher in the field of geriatrics and healthcare organization in order to improve the care offered to this vulnerable population.  Claire is currently a fourth year PhD student in Family Medicine at McGill University. She has worked with people with dementia and witnessed the daily challenges that patients and their caregivers have to face in navigating the healthcare system, due to the fact that the medical, social, and community services are fragmented and uncoordinated.   Her PhD thesis is about inappropriate acute hospital use of community-dwelling persons with dementia how to measure them, and prevent them, to ultimately inform healthcare policies aiming at reducing inappropriate acute hospital use in this population.        

Dr. Claire Godard-Sebillotte is a French geriatrician with an expertise in Epidemiology. She is a Vanier Scholar and a recipient of the CIHR Institute of Aging Anne Martin-Matthews Doctoral Prize of Excellence in Research on Aging. Her career goal is to be a clinician researcher in the field of geriatrics and healthcare organization in order to improve the care offered to this vulnerable population.

Claire is currently a fourth year PhD student in Family Medicine at McGill University. She has worked with people with dementia and witnessed the daily challenges that patients and their caregivers have to face in navigating the healthcare system, due to the fact that the medical, social, and community services are fragmented and uncoordinated. 

Her PhD thesis is about inappropriate acute hospital use of community-dwelling persons with dementia how to measure them, and prevent them, to ultimately inform healthcare policies aiming at reducing inappropriate acute hospital use in this population. 

 
 

 
 Caroline King is a PhD candidate in the Epidemiology department at McGill University. Her primary research interests are on understanding the impacts of public health polices on patient centred  outcomes. Under the guidence of Dr. Erin Strumpf, she is currently evaluating how patient- physician enrolment policies in primary care effect the quality and continuity of care that patients receive. 

Caroline King is a PhD candidate in the Epidemiology department at McGill University. Her primary research interests are on understanding the impacts of public health polices on patient centred  outcomes. Under the guidence of Dr. Erin Strumpf, she is currently evaluating how patient- physician enrolment policies in primary care effect the quality and continuity of care that patients receive. 

 Sahar Saeed is a doctoral candidate in the department of Epidemiology at McGill University, under the supervision of Dr. Erin Strumpf (3PO investigator) and Dr. Marina Klein (Infectious Disease Specialist/ Epidemiologist). Her research is focused on access to direct acting antivirals (DAAs) among key HIV-Hepatitis C co-infected populations (people who inject drugs, Indigenous people of Canada, women and men who have sex with men). She has investigated the generalizability of clinical trials evaluating DAAs (CID, 2016), the impact of patient-level barriers at accessing treatments (JIAS, 2017) and is currently working on projects that assess the role of structural barriers (health policy) on initiating DAAs. Her thesis also includes evaluating the impact of DAAs on quality of life, health service utilization, and behavior changes (illicit drug use, smoking and alcohol consumption) in real-world settings using quasi-experimental methodology (IJPH, 2018). She is supported by a Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Canadian Institute of Health Research Graduate Scholarship and a trainee of the Canadian Hepatitis C Network. 

Sahar Saeed is a doctoral candidate in the department of Epidemiology at McGill University, under the supervision of Dr. Erin Strumpf (3PO investigator) and Dr. Marina Klein (Infectious Disease Specialist/ Epidemiologist). Her research is focused on access to direct acting antivirals (DAAs) among key HIV-Hepatitis C co-infected populations (people who inject drugs, Indigenous people of Canada, women and men who have sex with men). She has investigated the generalizability of clinical trials evaluating DAAs (CID, 2016), the impact of patient-level barriers at accessing treatments (JIAS, 2017) and is currently working on projects that assess the role of structural barriers (health policy) on initiating DAAs. Her thesis also includes evaluating the impact of DAAs on quality of life, health service utilization, and behavior changes (illicit drug use, smoking and alcohol consumption) in real-world settings using quasi-experimental methodology (IJPH, 2018). She is supported by a Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Canadian Institute of Health Research Graduate Scholarship and a trainee of the Canadian Hepatitis C Network. 

 Brice Batomen Kuimi is a public health science researcher, currently a PhD Candidate in Epidemiology at McGill University. He holds a MSc in Epidemiology from Laval University (2012 -2014).  Before starting his PhD, Brice was a research assistant at the trauma-emergency and intensive care unit of CHU de Québec. His primary research interests are trauma care and injury, especially the organization of trauma systems. He is also interested in frailty and the prevention of functional decline in aging populations, and has done previous work on access to care for injured patients and social policy reforms.

Brice Batomen Kuimi is a public health science researcher, currently a PhD Candidate in Epidemiology at McGill University. He holds a MSc in Epidemiology from Laval University (2012 -2014).

Before starting his PhD, Brice was a research assistant at the trauma-emergency and intensive care unit of CHU de Québec. His primary research interests are trauma care and injury, especially the organization of trauma systems. He is also interested in frailty and the prevention of functional decline in aging populations, and has done previous work on access to care for injured patients and social policy reforms.

 Robin Richardson is completing her PhD in Epidemiology in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health at McGill University and will be starting a post-doctoral fellowship with the Psychiatric Epidemiology Training Program at Columbia University in the fall of 2018.  Her work focuses on understanding the social and structural factors that affect mental health in low- and middle-income countries, and she has a particular interest in identifying and evaluating social and economic policies that have the potential to reduce mental health inequalities.

Robin Richardson is completing her PhD in Epidemiology in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health at McGill University and will be starting a post-doctoral fellowship with the Psychiatric Epidemiology Training Program at Columbia University in the fall of 2018.

Her work focuses on understanding the social and structural factors that affect mental health in low- and middle-income countries, and she has a particular interest in identifying and evaluating social and economic policies that have the potential to reduce mental health inequalities.